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REfashiond Icon | Judy Huch [Tucson, Arizona]

I can't believe how close we are to releasing our magazine, and I am intent on bringing you your amazing women all the way up to the launch! 

I have had the absolute pleasure of getting to know Judy over the past year, and let me tell you, she is one badass woman. From what she does as an audiologist (and trying to educate about the importance of this industry), to her incredible non profit that serves those who are underserved (even over seas) to her fights for justice and love. She is absolutely someone who's energy makes you better just be being in the same space as her.

 

I am absolutely thrilled to bring her to you. 


Interview with Judy Huch

Jessica: What does RED symbolize for you?

 

Judy: Red is a symbol of power and rebirth for me and not just because it is a favorite color! When there are moments I want to tap into a deeper level of power I will wear Red to remind me that everything I need is within me and I just need to open up to show the world.

 

Jessica: What does Success REfashiond Mean to you?

 

Judy: Although I can see "retirement" easier now than 30 years ago, I am still very much entrenched in the more powerful age of my career. I am also in a field that I can continue to grow and learn which is wonderful as I am wired to be a life long learner. I can continue to grow, adapt and REfashion each step of my journey though life and my career.

 

Jessica: Tell us about you

 

Judy: I am a mother of two boys, who are the best legacy I could ever have imagined! My oldest is currently serving as a US Marine and our youngest is attending college at Manhattanville College in Purchase NY studying Music Business. I have been married to my husband since 1998, he compliments me in the best way possible as a life partner! I grew up in a very small town in Wyoming (aren't they all!) and the youngest of five. I keep saying my parents stopped when they got it right! We are avid travelers and in 2017 we started to serve on humanitarian trips around the world to combine my passion for audiology and love of travel. I love to color/paint in my down time and this can be colored pencils, paint by numbers, original canvas and walls!

 

Jessica: Tells us about what you do.

 

Judy: I have worked in the audiology world since 1991. I moved to Tucson in 1995 and bought my first practice in 1998 (that was a HUGE year in my life!) I grew my one woman practice in square footage and with woman power since that time. I own/operate Oro Valley Audiology in the far NW of Tucson and Grace Hearing Center which has offices in central Tucson, but we also travel to clinics and other community centers to make sure all can have hearing healthcare. When I mention audiology people assume all we do is sell hearing aids. The widget is only a small fraction of what we do in this doctorate level practice. We solve communication issues with technology, we conduct aural rehabilitation to strengthen ear to brain, we do tinnitus evaluations, tinnitus therapy, Auditory Processing Disorder testing (the only office in southern Arizona), ADP therapy, balance disorders and the most thorough diagnostic testing of any private practice in this part of the state.

 

Jessica: Why is the work you do so important?

 

Judy: Hearing is part of our 5 senses, and although life can be enriching without hearing we want to make sure everyone has access and care for every audiological need they have. Within the Deaf culture we work to make sure there is access to sign language interpreters, CART, close captioning and school/work needs are met. In the hard of hearing world information to the brain is critical and if this changes in life we are more susceptible to negative brain changes. We work with other health professionals to make sure the whole body is included with our care. We need to know someone is doing all they can to keep their diabetes under control as the risk of progressive hearing loss doubles. Many chronic health conditions affect the auditory system and we want to close the gap and educate all.

 

Jessica: What’s a common myth about your industry or business? and can you debunk it?

 

Judy: That hearing aids are too expensive. It is shown that the cost of NOT treating your hearing loss is close to 10K in revenue a year as well as increased fall risk, increased cognitive decline, increased depression.... but we just look at the cost of that particular moment in time of the widget. The cost of not treating is so much more than improving your life, communication and relationships. People don't realize this until it is too late. Also that anyone can do what we do.... audiologists are some of the most educated health professionals out there and if we are working at the top of our licensure, then we only make it LOOK like its easy.

 

Jessica: Do you think being a woman impacts any part of what you do differently than it might otherwise?

 

Judy: This is difficult for me to answer. Since I still come from a place of privilege and possibly stubbornness, I have rarely felt I have been given different rules. I may pick my battles and not remember (selectively) every instance either. If there is something I really want for myself, family or business I just work on it until it happens. I do remember when I was looking into moving my office by a hospital and the CEO at that time stated I needed to ask the ENT practice which was not associated with me for permission. I asked why and the CEO stated that the ENT practice may (MAY) have audiologists who work for them. I then asked if there were more than one GP, Internist, Cardio-vascular, etc in the building and he stated yes there were. I wanted clarification if they were in different practices, yes they are he stated. Then why would I ask a physician who isn't associated with me and what I do? He couldn't answer, so I bought a plot of land north of the hospital and am a property owner. If I had gotten the suite by the hospital, I would have been bought out 2 years later with nothing to show for it. Thanks MR CEO, I am better off!

 

Jessica: Do you feel like your industry is male dominant? 

 

Judy: 85% of Audiologists are women, but like any industry, look at who is published and is in leadership positions. We have an imbalance of white men in areas of power, prestige as well as pay inequity. The larger manufacturers who are huge influencers are mostly men in the higher executive positions. There is documentation in careers that take post doc education and if men previously were more represented the pay is higher, there is proof that pay drops when it becomes a woman lead industry. Cue the discussion.....

 

Jessica: What are some steps that individuals or society could take to support creating more gender balance in the future?

 

Judy: I love the saying "life as you climb" and want to keep this in the forefront of my mind. I am now in a position to uplift and help young individuals in my industry. I am also choosing who I support more critically. If I am invited to a conference, I am looking at who are the keynotes? Who is being represented? I am using my voice more to make sure we have better representation and my pocketbook to support the same.

 

Jessica: What was a struggle you remember facing when you began?

 

Judy: That I looked too young to run a practice.... until I didn't! Having people talk down to me because I didn't "look my age." Honestly this has been the most ridiculous thing. This along with "you would look better with a smile" type of behavior was challenging to move past. I am made to work through something, not around, so I did lose some patients because I didn't just brush comments like this aside.

 

Jessica: What was a moment where you felt like you had to be brave? Something that was scary for you, but you got through it anyway? 

 

Judy: I am a rape survivor, who was impregnated by my rapist, I figure I can get though anything! I had the choice to continue the pregnancy and to this day those who called me derogatory names and who victim shamed me now call me brave and resilient. I call them hypocrites but know I am stronger for taking the path I did. If I get frustrated or feel that I don't have the strength, I remind myself of what I have already accomplished, brush off my crown and move on.

 

Jessica: What is your biggest accomplishment?

 

Judy: My capacity to love and to find ways to serve my community. My love brought me my kids, my spouse and my business. I am hopeful I will leave this earth a little bit better for me being in it.

 

Jessica: What do you wish you had known when starting out?

 

Judy: That it is OK to not have everyone like me. That holding onto your convictions is a strength and that loving out loud is power.

 

Jessica: Are there any resources that have really helped you on your overall business journey?

 

Judy: To find those who will lift and hold you up are rare, but oh so precious. Finding those who love you but also hold you accountable to be better are far more valuable than those who just agree with you.

 

Jessica: What is your favorite quote?

 

Judy: "The thing to do, it seems to me, is to prepare yourself so you can be a rainbow in somebody else's cloud. Somebody who may not look like you. May not call God the same name you call God - if they call God at all. I may not dance your dances or speak your language. But be a blessing to somebody." Maya Angelo

 

Jessica: What's Your hype song? What would you walk out on stage to?

 

Judy: Unstoppable by Sia OR Underdog by The Script OR I Lived One Republic OR The Champion by Carrie Underwood..... honestly it depends :)

 

Jessica: Do you have a favorite word? 

 

Judy: DO; I am more of an action oriented person... I am good at listening, but if I only HEAR that someone wants to do something but doesn't DO it, it kinda drives me a little out of my mind.

 

Jessica: If you could have one superpower what would it be?

 

Judy: Show everyone unconditional love. I am really a work in progress with those who I don't really like

 

Jessica: Tell us about your awards, accolades and notable mentions!

 

Judy: 2019 I won Humanitarian of the Year from AT Still University, Woman of Impact and Woman of Influence; 2017 OpEd Project Fellow; 2021 Oro Valley Chamber of Commerce Non-Profit winner; 2022 BBB Torch Award for Best Non-Profit in Tucson

 

Jessica: Where would you like people to go to find you or find out more about what you do?

 

Judy:

EntheosHearing.com

GraceHearing.org

HearInTucson.com

HearingTheCall.org

and connect with me on LinkedIn! https://www.linkedin.com/in/judy-huch-aud-a3441019/


Do you. know an amazing Tucson woman who is making and impact and deserves recognition?

Nominate her below!

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